August 18th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 05:26pm on 18/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

“If any of it was true, all of it was true” seems to be simply another version of the fundamentalist insistence that if any of it is not true, then none of it is true. This is the house-of-cards implication fundies draw from their notion of biblical “inerrancy” which, again, has very little to do with the supposed inerrancy of what the Bible actually says and everything to do with their own alleged inerrancy as its interpreters.
August 17th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 10:48pm on 17/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

The Left Behind series sold more than 65 million copies. I can't offer a precise Venn diagram comparing those 65 million readers with the just-under 63 million Americans who voted for Donald Trump, but I would imagine the overlap in the middle would be pretty big. Their appeal is the same, and so is the audience.
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 08:21pm on 17/08/2017

Posted by jules

Soy & Honey Tofu with Sweet Potato Noodles-2

Honey & Soy Tofu with Sweet Potato ‘Noodles’

Sweet potato is one of the few vegetables (side from potatoes) that my boys love. Needless to say, I’m always trying to come up with new ways to use the sweet spud.

While chopping into chip shapes and roasting in coconut oil is my go-to move, these spiralized ‘noodles’ are a close second. They do take a little more active time to prepare, but I’ve found little fingers love getting the spiralizer out. And they only take 10 minutes in the oven so they’re pretty quick.

I was surprised how much they both love tofu. It’s a great staple to have in the fridge for when you need some last minute protein. My favourite ways to use tofu are in an easy tofu scramble, as a tasty ragu, these tofu ‘steaks’ or pan fried and given a flavour boost with some honey and soy like in the recipe below.

Make sure you buy firm tofu (rather than silken) and organic so there’s less likelihood of the soy being genetically modified.

enough for: 2-3 children
takes: 20 minutes
1 medium sweet potato
1/2 pack firm tofu (about 175g / 6oz)
1 teaspoon honey
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 small bunch coriander (cilantro)

1. Preheat your oven to 200C (400F). Scrub sweet potato and spiralize into medium ‘noodles’.

2. Place noodles on an oven proof baking tray. Drizzle with oil and toss to coat. Bake for 10 minutes or until ‘noodles’ are tender and cooked through.

3. Meanwhile slice tofu into 3 bricks about 1cm (1/3in) thick. Pan fry on a medium high heat with a little oil until golden brown on both sides.

4. Mix honey and soy sauce in a medium bowl. When the tofu is cooked, chop into bite sized chunks and toss in the honey and soy sauce.

5. To serve, divide warm sweet potato between 2-3 bowls. Top with tofu and sauce and coriander leaves (if using).

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Variations

extra crunch – serve with roast cashews or sesame seeds.

green-free – skip the coriander or replace with cashews or sesame seeds.

soy-free – replace with chicken thigh or breast fillets and adjust cooking time as needed.

carb-lovers – toss in cooked noodles or spaghetti with the sweet potato. Or serve everything with steamed rice.

low carb – replace sweet potato with 2 medium zucchini. And consider the chicken instead of the tofu. For more low carb ideas, see my other website Deliciously Diabetic. If you’re keeping things super low carb use a pinch of stevia instead of the honey.

no spiralizer – chop the sweet potato into shoestring fingers and increase the cooking time until they are tender (about 20 minutes depending on your knife skills). If you’re thinking about investing in a spiralizer, you might enjoy this article: Do You Need A Spiralizer?

other veg – carrots are also good.

sweeter – feel free to increase the honey.

gluten-free – use tamari or other gluten-free soy sauce.

different sauces – oyster or hoisin sauce can be used instead of the honey and soy.

more grown-up – toss in a little grated ginger and/or finely chopped garlic with the soy. And chopped green onions add lovely colour to the noodles. A few finely chopped red chillies wouldn’t go astray either. Or serve with Marco’s Chilli Oil.

Enjoy!

With love,
Jules x

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August 15th, 2017

Posted by jules

Roast Onions-2

When someone subscribes to the weekly Stonesoup email newsletter, I ask a couple of questions so I can get to know my new readers better.

One of them is how they discovered my blog. Every now and then I get an email saying they were looking for soup recipes and that for a blog called StoneSOUP, there weren’t as many soups as they would expect.

I take my reader feedback very seriously. So this year I’ve been on a mission to make more soup.

My plan is pretty simple. Monday night has become ‘soup night’.

It’s been brilliant for many reasons. Of course I’ve been making loads more soup. But it’s also made meal planning easier. Now I love Mondays!

But before we get into this week’s soup recipe (which is a total winner), I have a quick favour to ask.

I’m toying with the idea of making some changes to the focus of Stonesoup but before I do anything rash, I’d love to get your input.

So I’ve created a quick survey.

To share your thoughts go to:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/GCJGSTJ

It would mean so much to me to get your input to guide the direction of Stonesoup.

With love and thanks!
Jules
xoxo

ps. If you need more reasons to start upping your own soup intake, you might enjoy 7 Surprising Reasons to Eat More Soup.

___________________________________
No-Cry Roast Onion Soup-2

No-Cry Roast Onion Soup

I did toy with the idea of calling this soup ‘Aussie Onion Soup’, as opposed to the French variety. But the idea of roasting the onions first so you’re avoiding all the pain and tears involved in slicing your onions is just too brilliant (if I do say so myself) not to allude to it in the title.

Beef stock is traditionally used with French onion soup but I prefer the milder flavour of a chicken stock here. Of course vegetarians are welcome to use vegetable stock.

enough for: 2
takes about 60 minutes
4 red onions
1/2 cup white wine OR 1-2 tablespoons sherry or wine vinegar
3 cups stock
grated Parmesan cheese, to serve

1. Preheat your oven to 200C (400F). Cut the onions in half lengthwise. Remove any papery skins that are easy to discard but don’t worry about peeling.

2. Place onions cut side up on a roasting tray. Drizzle generously with oil and roast until well browned and soft – about 45 minutes.

3. When the onions are soft allow to cool for a few minutes before slipping them out of their skins. Slice cooked onion and place in a medium saucepan.

4. Add wine or vinegar and simmer for a few minutes before adding the stock. Bring to the boil then simmer for 5-10 minutes.

5. Taste and season generously with salt and pepper. Serve in deep bowls with parmesan grated over.

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Variations

different onions – use whatever onions you like. I prefer red for their sweeter flavour and because they look so pretty.

short on time – peel and slice onions and cook on the stove top with lots of butter or oil on a medium heat until soft. Then proceed as per the recipe.

herby – some thyme or rosemary can be lovely.

hot! – serve with a good drizzle of Marco’s Chilli Oil. OR add some chopped red chilli with the stock.

carb-lovers – toss in some cooked pasta, croutons or cooked beans or lentils.

more traditional – melt some cheese on slices of sourdough toast and float these on top before serving.

more veg – feel free to wilt in some greens jsut before serving. Fine ribbons of kale are lovely as is baby spinach.

dairy-free – replace parmesan with grated brazil nuts or roast pine nuts.

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August 14th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 07:49pm on 14/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

Drew G.I. Hart’s discussion of Paula Deen seems timely. This is from his fine book, Trouble I’ve Seen: Changing the Way the Church Views Racism. Hart reviews the “really ugly comments” the celebrity chef made back in 2013, resulting in her near-universal condemnation in public: Deen’s racism was too overt, and she broke all the rules. […]
August 13th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 10:29am on 13/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

In the midst of blatant injustices inflicted upon the Negro, I have watched white churchmen stand on the sideline and mouth pious irrelevancies and sanctimonious trivialities. In the midst of a mighty struggle to rid our nation of racial and economic injustice, I have heard many ministers say: "Those are social issues, with which the gospel has no real concern."
August 12th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 11:24pm on 12/08/2017
August 11th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 11:40am on 11/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

The central figure in this message is not Christ, but the Antichrist. It’s fair to ask, then, if LaHaye and Jenkins’ religion might not be more accurately called “Antichristianity.” In their defense, however, we should note that the essential focus of their religion is not to celebrate or serve the Antichrist, but rather to oppose him. That would make their religion something more like “Anti-Antichrist-ianity.” To their way of thinking, Anti-Antichristianity is pretty much the same thing as Christianity.
August 10th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 11:32pm on 10/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

Richard Mouw and Jerry Falwell Jr. are both evangelical Christians, both leaders of prominent evangelical institutions. But, as Mouw writes to Falwell, they "travel in very different parts of the evangelical world." That understates the situation. They travel in different worlds -- in the distinct realms of separate constituencies that rarely, if ever, communicate.
August 9th, 2017
August 8th, 2017

Posted by Fred Clark

Specific, skeptical questions about purported signs and wonders are not theological but journalistic -- who? what? when? where? Whether or not those asking such basic factual questions can recite any given sectarian catechism is irrelevant to the answers. Catechizing me instead of pursuing those answers seems like an attempt to evade the original question of what, if anything, just happened.
posted by [syndicated profile] stonesoup_feed at 04:26am on 08/08/2017

Posted by jules

Avo on Toast with Smashed Olives & Tahini-3

Do you ever feel confused by nutrition? I know.

Even though I’ve studied nutrition at university as part of my Food Science degree, I sometimes feel a little overwhelmed. When I read the latest study comparing different diets it can be a bit much. Low fat, paleo, vegetarian, LCHF, plant based, low carb?!

What’s a girl to eat?

When I start to feel that overwhelm I come back to some simple principles to guide my eating:

  • Eat real food (adapted from Michael Pollan)
  • Eat lots of veggies (adapted from Michael Pollan)
  • Watch the carbs (not adapted from Michael Pollan!)
  • Experiment with what works for you.

Since being diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and then Type 2, I’ve found that for me, eating Low Carb with a generous dose of healthy fat works best.

Of course that may not be what works for you! We truly are all different and it’s so important to find the approach that is best for your situation.

3 Reasons I LOVE Eating Low Carb

1. Low Carb is Delicious!
As a huge huge food lover, there is no way I could stick to a Low Carb lifestyle if it didn’t taste amazing. The pleasure of food is a non-negotiable in my world.

Luckily I’ve discovered that it’s super easy to really enjoy Low Carb food, especially when you include all the delicious, flavour-carrying fats. I never feel deprived.

2. Low Carb Keeps My Blood Sugar Stable
I still test my fasting blood sugar every morning and it’s easy to tell when I’ve let the carbs creep in (hello whole bottle of Proscecco!). But a day of Low Carb eating easily puts the old glucose back on track.

3. Low Carb Helps Manage my Weight.
Apart from the year I spent backpacking around the world and living on beer and bread, I’ve never been really overweight. But I have always struggled with a bulge around my waistline.

When I started eating Low Carb and my body shape stopped being a constant struggle. Maintaining a healthy weight became so much easier.

I really noticed this with my pregnancies. For my first I wasn’t diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes and I gained 20kg (40lb). With my second I really focused on eating Low Carb and monitoring my blood sugar after every meal and guess what? I only gained 15kg (30lb) even though I was exercising less.

Are you looking for EASY Low Carb recipes?

DD Free eCookbook 3D cover

Then check out my NEW website, Deliciously Diabetic!

Make sure you don’t miss the FREE eCookbook with 24 EASY Low Carb recipes!

Grab your FREE copy at:
https://www.deliciously-diabetic.com/

Enjoy!
Jules xoxo
__________________________________

Avo on Toast with Smashed Olives & Tahini

Avo on Toast with Smashed Olives & Tahini

We Australians love to abbreviate everything. In case you’re wondering ‘avo’ is actually avocado. While there aren’t many things I miss being Low Carb, ‘Avo on Toast’ was one of them. So happy to have found a Low Carb bread that means I can enjoy my avocado AND keep my blood sugar happy. Of course you’re welcome to use whatever bread you prefer.

You don’t really need a recipe for this idea but the contrast of the salty piquant olives with the creamy avo and tahini really takes this to the next level!

enough for: 2
takes: 10 minutes
1 slice broccoli bread
1 small avocado or 1/2 large
squeeze lime
4-5 kalamata olives, smashed
2 tablespoons tahini

1. Toast your bread.

2. Halve avocado and scoop flesh onto the toast. Smash roughly with a fork to cover the surface. Sprinkle generously with black pepper and some sea salt flakes (remembering your olives will add salt too).

3. Squeeze over lime. Smash olives with the side of your knife and remove stones. Scatter smashed olives over the avo and drizzle over tahini.

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Variations

more simple – just use avocado and lime with lashings of black pepper.

no tahini – just skip it or try sprinkling with dukkah, roast pine nuts or sesame seeds instead.

carb-lovers – use your favourite bread. True carb lovers might like to spread their toppings over 2 slices!

another fave avo on toast topping – sprinkle with Shicimi Togarashi.

no avo – replace with regular hummus or my Low Carb Roast Cauliflower Hummus and skip the tahini.

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August 7th, 2017
posted by [syndicated profile] slacktivist_feed at 10:19pm on 07/08/2017

Posted by Fred Clark

The INC apostles are not doing exactly what Simon did. They're not trying to obtain the Holy Spirit with money, but are offering to provide it to others for a price. The same basic idea is at work, though -- the buying and selling of spiritual gifts in exchange for money -- and that still seems to fall under the category of Simony. It's the same sin whether you're buying or selling.

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